LOWDOWN Winter 2015 page 3

  The Editor’s Bark!   woof!   woof!   woof!

Welcome to the latest issue of BHOC's Lowdown.

I do hope you enjoyed the so- called summer and managed to spend quality time with your lovely hounds. Though the summer never really seemed to really establish itself.

This time of the year seems a good opportunity to look back and review the past twelve months.

Though the summer was wetter and colder than we all wanted, we were mostly lucky for the Club’s walks and Fun Day.

All events have been consistently well attended - it is always lovely to see you and your hounds.

There have been wonderful new additions to the Club ‘pack’, but sadly, we have also lost some dear canine friends.

Committee members, Jayne and Chris Cooper, said a sad farewell to their irrepressible tri-colour, Krishna.

Also gone are two hounds that Frankie and I were particularly close to, Jean Miller’s Cassius and Carolynne and Anthony Morris’ Bo.

Dear Cass was a very sweet- natured chap and we loved bringing him and Jean to the walks. He was a super example of his breed and achieved great success in the show ring.

His presence was such that he was the only male hound to be accepted by our two ‘boys’ when sharing the car ride. We miss him very much and our thoughts are with dearJean.

Bo in her later years was a frequent guest at our place whenever Carolynne and Anthony required her looking after.

She was quite a character and we always greatly looked forward to her visits. Pablo and Nico also enjoyed her being here and she knew exactly how to keep them in their places.

Assuming the demeanour of some haughty dowager, she would take tours of the garden, most often with Nico in attendance, meekly following several paces behind.

She was adored by her family and her passing has been heartbreaking for them.

I am sure all members send sympathy and best wishes to everyone who has experienced the loss of a dear pet this year.

By the way, do let me have your reminisces and images of your own late hounds. It seems a fitting way to celebrate and mark their all too short lives and may help others to bear the loss of their own dear hounds when that inevitable sad time comes.

On a much brighter note, I am pleased to report that Jill and Brian’s lovely boy, Chevy, is making a remarkably quick recovery following major spinal surgery.

This tricky operation took place at the well known Fitzpatrick Referrals, in Surrey, owned by Noel ‘Supervet’ Fitzpatrick. Another vet at the practice was responsible for Chevy’s treatment and Brian seemed very impressed with the service received there.

We were all pleasantly surprised to see Chevy attend the Broadstone CP walk only a short time after his big ordeal.

It seems it will be very soon that he can undertake full walks again.

Well done, Chevy!


Frankie and I were very lucky to have an opportunity to take a two-week break in Norfolk in late September. The weather during our stay was wonderful - save for two days when it rained - and we enjoyed lots of warm autumn sun.

For our first week we stayed at a lovely converted barn in the heart of the countryside, which was perfect. It backed onto vast, ploughed fields, so typical of Norfolk. The ‘boys’ loved watching this landscape for wildlife suitable for chasing - allbeit fruitlessly.

There was a nearby massive colony of rabbits and Nico appeared at the door on two occasions with an already dead bunny's body in his mouth. Apparently, the local farmer had been out shooting them, leaving some corpses behind.

Trying to catch Nico to retrieve this bounty took much guile and ingenuity, he being determined to hold onto his prey. We were not too sure of the previous good health of these poor creatures.

We were exhausted chasing him, but he enjoyed this game - I mean the sport, not the rabbit!

The open views offered the most spectacular sunsets; and evening barbecues with this as a background were wonderful.

Touring the Norfolk hinterland of small market towns and villages was a delight. Our schedule and direction was normally dictated by when local farmers’ markets were being held.

On our second week we stayed right on the coast in a small coastguard cottage. This gave us the chance for long coastal walks.

The hounds loved free-running along the wide beaches - dogs being allowed on them at this time of the year. We walked for miles.

There is something very special about exercising dogs on sand and they really love it.

Cromer Beach, North Norfolk.

BHOC Hon Secretary on Cromer Pier, North Norfolk.

Our two are not so fond of the actual sea, they seem to view those dogs who do with incomprehension. For them it’s just too similar to having a dreaded bath.

Nico can sometimes be induced to paddle through a warm rock-pool if he judges the water to not be too deep - something he often gets very wrong — but for Pablo this kind of aquatic adventure is a definite no, no. It's a bit of a shame because I think seawater is beneficial for their coats and skin. But neither of them seem to appreciate this.

The big bonus of beach walking for them is coming across the remnants of dead crabs abandoned by disturbed gulls.

And Cromer crabs are delicious!

Enjoying these treats does leave a legacy on their breath - very noticeable on the trip home. So it is often with all windows open that we travel back from these walks - dogs' heads poking out and totally enjoying this outdoor life.

There was something really special about this trip, full as it was with long coastal walks; fish & chip lunches - eaten al fresco on sea walls; discovering country pubs in sleepy hamlets; and sampling local brews with Ye Olde Worlde names, straight out of Tolkien or some adman’s fevered imagination.

Waxie’s Dargle, a beer from over the county line in Suffolk, proved to be quite palatable - from what I can recall.

Good times! Made all the better for seeing two tired and contented Basset Hounds sleeping and loudly snoring on the hearth at the end of another exhausting day.

When being shown around one of the bedrooms of the last property by the owner, I asked what on earth was in the large, imposing wardrobe standing in one corner.

She replied, “It’s Narnia your business!”

Season’s greetings to you all. Have fun!

editor@bassethoundowners.org.uk

Cover of the Basset Hound Owners Club newsletter Lowdown

Welcome to the latest issue of BHOC's Lowdown.

I do hope you enjoyed the so- called summer and managed to spend quality time with your lovely hounds. Though the summer never really seemed to really establish itself.

This time of the year seems a good opportunity to look back and review the past twelve months.

Though the summer was wetter and colder than we all wanted, we were mostly lucky for the Club’s walks and Fun Day.

All events have been consistently well attended - it is always lovely to see you and your hounds.

There have been wonderful new additions to the Club ‘pack’, but sadly, we have also lost some dear canine friends.

Committee members, Jayne and Chris Cooper, said a sad farewell to their irrepressible tri-colour, Krishna.

Also gone are two hounds that Frankie and I were particularly close to, Jean Miller’s Cassius and Carolynne and Anthony Morris’ Bo.

Dear Cass was a very sweet- natured chap and we loved bringing him and Jean to the walks. He was a super example of his breed and achieved great success in the show ring.

His presence was such that he was the only male hound to be accepted by our two ‘boys’ when sharing the car ride. We miss him very much and our thoughts are with dearJean.

Bo in her later years was a frequent guest at our place whenever Carolynne and Anthony required her looking after.

She was quite a character and we always greatly looked forward to her visits. Pablo and Nico also enjoyed her being here and she knew exactly how to keep them in their places.

Assuming the demeanour of some haughty dowager, she would take tours of the garden, most often with Nico in attendance, meekly following several paces behind.

She was adored by her family and her passing has been heartbreaking for them.

I am sure all members send sympathy and best wishes to everyone who has experienced the loss of a dear pet this year.

By the way, do let me have your reminisces and images of your own late hounds. It seems a fitting way to celebrate and mark their all too short lives and may help others to bear the loss of their own dear hounds when that inevitable sad time comes.

On a much brighter note, I am pleased to report that Jill and Brian’s lovely boy, Chevy, is making a remarkably quick recovery following major spinal surgery.

This tricky operation took place at the well known Fitzpatrick Referrals, in Surrey, owned by Noel ‘Supervet’ Fitzpatrick. Another vet at the practice was responsible for Chevy’s treatment and Brian seemed very impressed with the service received there.

We were all pleasantly surprised to see Chevy attend the Broadstone CP walk only a short time after his big ordeal.

It seems it will be very soon that he can undertake full walks again.

Well done, Chevy!


Frankie and I were very lucky to have an opportunity to take a two-week break in Norfolk in late September. The weather during our stay was wonderful - save for two days when it rained - and we enjoyed lots of warm autumn sun.

For our first week we stayed at a lovely converted barn in the heart of the countryside, which was perfect. It backed onto vast, ploughed fields, so typical of Norfolk. The ‘boys’ loved watching this landscape for wildlife suitable for chasing - allbeit fruitlessly.

There was a nearby massive colony of rabbits and Nico appeared at the door on two occasions with an already dead bunny's body in his mouth. Apparently, the local farmer had been out shooting them, leaving some corpses behind.

Trying to catch Nico to retrieve this bounty took much guile and ingenuity, he being determined to hold onto his prey. We were not too sure of the previous good health of these poor creatures.

We were exhausted chasing him, but he enjoyed this game - I mean the sport, not the rabbit!

The open views offered the most spectacular sunsets; and evening barbecues with this as a background were wonderful.

Touring the Norfolk hinterland of small market towns and villages was a delight. Our schedule and direction was normally dictated by when local farmers’ markets were being held.

On our second week we stayed right on the coast in a small coastguard cottage. This gave us the chance for long coastal walks.

The hounds loved free-running along the wide beaches - dogs being allowed on them at this time of the year. We walked for miles.

There is something very special about exercising dogs on sand and they really love it.

Cromer Beach, North Norfolk.

BHOC Hon Secretary on Cromer Pier, North Norfolk.

Our two are not so fond of the actual sea, they seem to view those dogs who do with incomprehension. For them it’s just too similar to having a dreaded bath.

Nico can sometimes be induced to paddle through a warm rock-pool if he judges the water to not be too deep - something he often gets very wrong — but for Pablo this kind of aquatic adventure is a definite no, no. It's a bit of a shame because I think seawater is beneficial for their coats and skin. But neither of them seem to appreciate this.

The big bonus of beach walking for them is coming across the remnants of dead crabs abandoned by disturbed gulls.

And Cromer crabs are delicious!

Enjoying these treats does leave a legacy on their breath - very noticeable on the trip home. So it is often with all windows open that we travel back from these walks - dogs' heads poking out and totally enjoying this outdoor life.

There was something really special about this trip, full as it was with long coastal walks; fish & chip lunches - eaten al fresco on sea walls; discovering country pubs in sleepy hamlets; and sampling local brews with Ye Olde Worlde names, straight out of Tolkien or some adman’s fevered imagination.

Waxie’s Dargle, a beer from over the county line in Suffolk, proved to be quite palatable - from what I can recall.

Good times! Made all the better for seeing two tired and contented Basset Hounds sleeping and loudly snoring on the hearth at the end of another exhausting day.

When being shown around one of the bedrooms of the last property by the owner, I asked what on earth was in the large, imposing wardrobe standing in one corner.

She replied, “It’s Narnia your business!”

Season’s greetings to you all. Have fun!

editor@bassethoundowners.org.uk

Cover of the Basset Hound Owners Club newsletter Lowdown

Welcome to the latest issue of BHOC's Lowdown.

I do hope you enjoyed the so- called summer and managed to spend quality time with your lovely hounds. Though the summer never really seemed to really establish itself.

This time of the year seems a good opportunity to look back and review the past twelve months.

Though the summer was wetter and colder than we all wanted, we were mostly lucky for the Club’s walks and Fun Day.

All events have been consistently well attended - it is always lovely to see you and your hounds.

There have been wonderful new additions to the Club ‘pack’, but sadly, we have also lost some dear canine friends.

Committee members, Jayne and Chris Cooper, said a sad farewell to their irrepressible tri-colour, Krishna.

Also gone are two hounds that Frankie and I were particularly close to, Jean Miller’s Cassius and Carolynne and Anthony Morris’ Bo.

Dear Cass was a very sweet- natured chap and we loved bringing him and Jean to the walks. He was a super example of his breed and achieved great success in the show ring.

His presence was such that he was the only male hound to be accepted by our two ‘boys’ when sharing the car ride. We miss him very much and our thoughts are with dearJean.

Bo in her later years was a frequent guest at our place whenever Carolynne and Anthony required her looking after.

She was quite a character and we always greatly looked forward to her visits. Pablo and Nico also enjoyed her being here and she knew exactly how to keep them in their places.

Assuming the demeanour of some haughty dowager, she would take tours of the garden, most often with Nico in attendance, meekly following several paces behind.

She was adored by her family and her passing has been heartbreaking for them.

I am sure all members send sympathy and best wishes to everyone who has experienced the loss of a dear pet this year.

By the way, do let me have your reminisces and images of your own late hounds. It seems a fitting way to celebrate and mark their all too short lives and may help others to bear the loss of their own dear hounds when that inevitable sad time comes.

On a much brighter note, I am pleased to report that Jill and Brian’s lovely boy, Chevy, is making a remarkably quick recovery following major spinal surgery.

This tricky operation took place at the well known Fitzpatrick Referrals, in Surrey, owned by Noel ‘Supervet’ Fitzpatrick. Another vet at the practice was responsible for Chevy’s treatment and Brian seemed very impressed with the service received there.

We were all pleasantly surprised to see Chevy attend the Broadstone CP walk only a short time after his big ordeal.

It seems it will be very soon that he can undertake full walks again.

Well done, Chevy!


Frankie and I were very lucky to have an opportunity to take a two-week break in Norfolk in late September. The weather during our stay was wonderful - save for two days when it rained - and we enjoyed lots of warm autumn sun.

For our first week we stayed at a lovely converted barn in the heart of the countryside, which was perfect. It backed onto vast, ploughed fields, so typical of Norfolk. The ‘boys’ loved watching this landscape for wildlife suitable for chasing - allbeit fruitlessly.

There was a nearby massive colony of rabbits and Nico appeared at the door on two occasions with an already dead bunny's body in his mouth. Apparently, the local farmer had been out shooting them, leaving some corpses behind.

Trying to catch Nico to retrieve this bounty took much guile and ingenuity, he being determined to hold onto his prey. We were not too sure of the previous good health of these poor creatures.

We were exhausted chasing him, but he enjoyed this game - I mean the sport, not the rabbit!

The open views offered the most spectacular sunsets; and evening barbecues with this as a background were wonderful.

Touring the Norfolk hinterland of small market towns and villages was a delight. Our schedule and direction was normally dictated by when local farmers’ markets were being held.

On our second week we stayed right on the coast in a small coastguard cottage. This gave us the chance for long coastal walks.

The hounds loved free-running along the wide beaches - dogs being allowed on them at this time of the year. We walked for miles.

There is something very special about exercising dogs on sand and they really love it.

Cromer Beach, North Norfolk.

BHOC Hon Secretary on Cromer Pier, North Norfolk.

Our two are not so fond of the actual sea, they seem to view those dogs who do with incomprehension. For them it’s just too similar to having a dreaded bath.

Nico can sometimes be induced to paddle through a warm rock-pool if he judges the water to not be too deep - something he often gets very wrong — but for Pablo this kind of aquatic adventure is a definite no, no. It's a bit of a shame because I think seawater is beneficial for their coats and skin. But neither of them seem to appreciate this.

The big bonus of beach walking for them is coming across the remnants of dead crabs abandoned by disturbed gulls.

And Cromer crabs are delicious!

Enjoying these treats does leave a legacy on their breath - very noticeable on the trip home. So it is often with all windows open that we travel back from these walks - dogs' heads poking out and totally enjoying this outdoor life.

There was something really special about this trip, full as it was with long coastal walks; fish & chip lunches - eaten al fresco on sea walls; discovering country pubs in sleepy hamlets; and sampling local brews with Ye Olde Worlde names, straight out of Tolkien or some adman’s fevered imagination.

Waxie’s Dargle, a beer from over the county line in Suffolk, proved to be quite palatable - from what I can recall.

Good times! Made all the better for seeing two tired and contented Basset Hounds sleeping and loudly snoring on the hearth at the end of another exhausting day.

When being shown around one of the bedrooms of the last property by the owner, I asked what on earth was in the large, imposing wardrobe standing in one corner.

She replied, “It’s Narnia your business!”

Season’s greetings to you all. Have fun!

editor@bassethoundowners.org.uk

Cover of the Basset Hound Owners Club newsletter Lowdown

first published in LOWDOWN

editor Tony Roberts